(3) - WHO, Global Burden of Disease, Project: 2002, International Injury and Fatality Statistics.
www.who.int/entity/violence_injury_prevention/publications/road_traffic/world_report/chapter1.pdf

“Road traffic injuries are a major but neglected global public health problem, requiring concerted efforts for effective and sustainable prevention. Of all the systems that people have to deal with on a daily basis, road transport is the most complex and the most dangerous. World-wide, the number of people killed in road traffic crashes each year is estimated at almost 1.2 million, while the number injured could be as high as 50 million – the combined population of five of the world’s large cities. The tragedy behind these figures regularly attracts less media attention than other, less frequent but more unusual types of tragedy. What is worse, without increased efforts and new initiatives, the total number of road traffic deaths world-wide and injuries is forecast to rise by some 65% between 2000 and 2020 (1, 2), and in low income and middle-income countries deaths are expected to increase by as much as 80%. The majority of such deaths are currently among “vulnerable road users” – pedestrians, pedal cyclists and motorcyclists.”